Tags et Filtres

Résultats de la recherche

23 résultat(s) trouvé(s) Trier par
  1. Huygens set for the big jump

    Date de publication:

    15 Décembre 2004

    Six months after the arrival of Cassini-Huygens at Saturn, mission scientists are gearing up for a new phase. Like a Christmas present tumbling from Santa’s sleigh, the European Huygens probe will be cut loose from the orbiter on 25 December, before diving into Titan’s atmosphere 3 weeks later. Huygens is expected to improve our understanding of Saturn’s largest moon, the only one in the Solar System known to have a dense atmosphere containing organic molecules.

    Tags associés:

  2. Huygens- Landing on Titan

    Date de publication:

    11 Septembre 2017

    In December 2004, the U.S. Cassini spacecraft released the European Huygens module for the most-distant landing yet accomplished in the history of space exploration. Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, was the target and the high point of this collaboration that has brought great discoveries in planetology. With the Cassini mission now set to end, Athéna Coustenis, research director at the LESIA space and astrophysics instrumentation research laboratory at the Paris Observatory, looks at what it found there.

    Tags associés:

  3. Cassini: Destination Moons

    Date de publication:

    6 Septembre 2017

    In the space of 13 years, Cassini observed Saturn and devoted a lot of attention to its moons. With the mission now about to end, Patrick Michel, astrophysicist, planetologist and research director at the Côte d’Azur Observatory in Nice, reflects on the discoveries it has made about the planet’s natural satellites.

    Tags associés:

  4. Grand Finale- Cassini bids farewell

    Date de publication:

    14 Septembre 2017

    15 September 2017 will mark the end of the Cassini mission, after 13 years exploring the Saturn system. With its fuel fast running out, the spacecraft will plunge into the gas giant’s atmosphere where it will acquire one last series of science data before breaking up and falling silent forever. Philippe Zarka, astrophysics research director at the LESIA space and astrophysics instrumentation research laboratory at the Paris Observatory, takes us through Cassini’s final minutes.

    Tags associés:

  5. Cassini- Exploring beneath Enceladus’ icy crust

    Date de publication:

    8 Septembre 2017

    Besides studying Saturn and its rings, a good deal of the Cassini mission focused on the planet’s moons. Among those where the most discoveries have been made is Enceladus, an icy but surprisingly active world. Gabriel Tobie, a research scientist at the LPGN planetology and geodynamics laboratory in Nantes, gives us the details.

    Tags associés:

  6. Cassini-Huygens: a 30-year space odyssey

    Date de publication:

    30 Août 2017

    Cassini-Huygens is a joint NASA-ESA mission to Saturn and its moons. As the mission prepares to take its curtain call, Christophe Sotin, Chief Scientist, Solar System Exploration at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, looks back at the genesis of the project.

    Tags associés:

  7. Saturn’s rings through the eyes of Cassini

    Date de publication:

    4 Septembre 2017

    As well as studying Saturn and its moons, Cassini also trained its sights on the planet’s rings, analysing their composition, structure and dynamics to learn more about the physics of these very special features. Sébastien Charnoz, an astrophysicist at Paris Diderot University and research scientist at the IPGP global physics institute in Paris, looks back at what the mission has found.

    Tags associés:

  8. Les anneaux de Saturne sous l’œil de Cassini

    Date de publication:

    4 Septembre 2017

    En plus d’avoir étudié Saturne et ses satellites, Cassini s’est également focalisée sur les anneaux. Elle a pu en étudier la composition, la structure et la dynamique, permettant d’en apprendre davantage sur la physique de ces objets très particuliers. Retour sur ces découvertes avec Sébastien Charnoz, astrophysicien à l’université Paris Diderot et chercheur à l’Institut de Physique du Globe.

    Tags associés:

  9. Grand Finale: les adieux de Cassini

    Date de publication:

    14 Septembre 2017

    Le 15 septembre 2017 marquera la fin de la mission Cassini, après 13 années passées à explorer le système de Saturne. À court de carburant, elle plongera dans l’atmosphère de la géante gazeuse pour nous en fournir les dernières données, avant de s’y désintégrer et que son signal ne se taise à jamais. Discutons des derniers instants de Cassini en compagnie de Philippe Zarka, directeur de recherche CNRS en astrophysique au LESIA, à l’Observatoire de Paris.

    Tags associés:

  10. Huygens, le choc de Titan

    Date de publication:

    11 Septembre 2017

    En décembre 2004, la sonde américaine Cassini envoyait le module européen Huygens vers le sol le plus lointain jamais atteint par l’exploration spatiale. Titan, la plus grande lune de Saturne, a été le point d’orgue de cette collaboration qui a amené à de grandes découvertes en planétologie. À l’occasion de la fin de mission de Cassini, retournons sur Titan avec Athéna Coustenis, directrice de recherche CNRS au LESIA, à l’Observatoire de Paris.

    Tags associés:

  11. Cassini, un regard sous la glace d’Encelade

    Date de publication:

    8 Septembre 2017

    En plus de Saturne et de ses anneaux, une grande partie de la mission Cassini a été consacrée à l’étude des satellites. Parmi ceux qui ont été les plus riches en découvertes se trouve Encelade, un monde gelé et pourtant étonnamment actif. Revenons sur son exploration avec Gabriel Tobie, chargé de recherche CNRS au laboratoire de planétologie et géodynamique de l’université de Nantes.

    Tags associés:

  12. Cassini: objectif lunes

    Date de publication:

    6 Septembre 2017

    En 13 ans, la sonde Cassini a observé Saturne et consacré beaucoup d’attention à ses lunes. A l’occasion de la fin de cette mission, revenons sur les découvertes faites sur ces satellites naturels avec Patrick Michel, astrophysicien et planétologue, directeur de recherche au CNRS à l’Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur à Nice.

    Tags associés:

  13. Cassini-Huygens: retour sur 30 ans d’histoire spatiale

    Date de publication:

    30 Août 2017

    Cassini-Huygens est une double mission NASA-ESA à destination de Saturne et de ses lunes. A l’occasion de la fin de la mission, Christophe Sotin revient sur ce qui a inspiré ce projet, en tant que directeur scientifique pour l’exploration du Système solaire au JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) de Pasadena.

    Tags associés:

  14. Tags associés:

  15. Tags associés:

  16. Tags associés:

  17. Tags associés:

  18. First findings from Cassini-Huygens

    Date de publication:

    30 Septembre 2004

    Early this summer, just days after entering orbit, the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft sent back its first findings from Saturn. Preliminary science results are beginning to shed new light on a complex and fascinating planetary system. Having discovered new satellites and made measurements of unprecedented precision, Cassini’s first weeks at Saturn are already looking very promising.

    Tags associés:

  19. Huygens: an emotional first encounter with Titan

    Date de publication:

    16 Janvier 2005

    Friday evening, in Paris, a crowd of more than 2,000 filed into the auditorium at the Cité des Sciences et de l’Industrie to witness the arrival of the Huygens probe on Titan. Huygens had already successfully landed at its destination earlier in the day. Now, everybody was eagerly awaiting the first sights and sounds from this distant world over 1 billion km from Earth. One of the first images taken by Huygens. Titan’s surface is darker than scientists expected and is likely a mixture of water ice and hydrocarbons. Crédits : ESA/NASA/University of Arizona

    Tags associés:

  20. Cassini-Huygens mission- Titan one year on

    Date de publication:

    9 Janvier 2006

    Cassini-Huygens is the 1st space mission dedicated to exploring Saturn and its system of rings and moons. One year ago today, Europe’s Huygens probe separated from the Cassini orbiter and landed on Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. What have its findings taught us about this tantalizing new world?

    Tags associés:

Pages